Study Shows Youth with Type 1 Diabetes May Have Difficulty Sleeping

Michelle M. Perfect, Ph.D., of the University of Arizona and colleagues tracked the sleep health of 50 patients aged 10 to 16 years, with T1DM (type 1 diabetes mellitus).

Researchers found that most young patients with T1DM spent about 21 minutes (5 percent) less in deep sleep during a seven-hour period than individuals without diabetes. Even those with mild sleep issues experienced:

  • More hyperglycemia and emotional behavioral difficulties
  • Lower grades
  • Depression
  • Sleep-wake behavior problems
  • Sleepiness

The researchers suggested that, due to these findings, clinician awareness of potential sleep problems for these individuals could help them improve their quality of life. Being aware that T1DM may affect sleepiness, behavioral issues or poor school performance, may help school-based professionals understand these youths’ needs more.

 

New Study Finds Babies with Sleep Problems at Higher Risk for Sleep Disorders

A new study found 10 percent of infants and toddlers have trouble sleeping, and may be at risk for developing sleep disorders as they age.

Dr. Jyoti Krishna with the Cleveland Clinic said talking specifics with your pediatrician about various sleep behaviors can help solve some of these infant sleep problems.

“Hitting upon how easy it is to put them to bed, how easy it is to get the child to go to sleep, to stay asleep, daytime sleeping or napping behaviors and other problematic nighttime behaviors, as well as sleeping in their own bed versus a parental bed,” said Dr. Krishna.

Creating a healthy sleep zone for your baby is very important to their quality of sleep. This includes protecting their cribs from things like dust mites, allergens and accidents. Protect-A-Bed has a variety of products that can help. Check Protect-A-Bed’s website for more information.

Small Changes to Your Home Can Lead to Big Gains in Sleep

Small home improvements can lead to improved sleep. Fox News shared a list of several things to consider for a healthy sleep zone:

Dark Cool Rooms

Sunlight can be blocked out of the bedroom by blackout curtains or other heavy fabric curtains. These also can add a layer of thermal insulation, keeping the room cool in the summer and warm in the winter.

Maintaining a cool temperature in the bedroom is also a key to a good night’s sleep. Studies have shown that people sleep better in cooler rooms (60 to 68 degrees).

Optimize Comfort

Replacing an old mattress may be an option for some, but adding a memory foam pad or mattress pad is also a more affordable option.

Replacing old pillows can help improve sleep as well. The polyester stuffing in most traditional pillows flattens out and causes the pillow to lose its shape and firmness after one year.

Protect-A-Bed now offers a Luxury Sleep line that uses Eucalyptus based fiber to create a thermo-regulating sleep zone. This revolutionary fiber helps keep the bed warm in the winter and cool in the summer while protecting sensitive skin from dust mites and allergens.

Soundproofing

If noisy neighbors are a problem, making small changes can help cut back on the clamor. Replacing old single-pane windows can help block out noise from outside. Also, adding a layer of carpet or throw rugs can create a barrier between you and neighbors. White noise machines can also drown out noise. These create a soothing hum of neutral white noise.

 

For more tips on obtaining more sleep, visit Fox News’ website.

 

Recent Study Suggests Nap-Deprived Tots at Risk for Emotional Problems

A new study on nap-deprivation in children suggests that lack of afternoon sleep could increase odds of emotional problems later in life.

Photo Credit: DeviantArt.com via Google Images

Photo Credit: DeviantArt.com via Google Images

Monique LeBourgeois, director of the sleep and development laboratory at the University of Colorado at Boulder, told The Sacramento Bee that lack of sleep disrupts a child’s ability to build skills for managing emotions. This could put them at risk for lifelong mood-related problems such as anxiety and depression.

About 20 percent of toddlers aren’t getting the suggested minimum of 10 hours of sleep a night, said LeBourgeois. The study, funded by the National Institute of Mental Health tested the effect of nap deprivation on 2 ½ to 3-year-old children.

Toddlers were given puzzles and activities after varying levels of sleep. Researchers paid attention to emotional cues (or lack thereof) to test the theory. Those who skipped, even one day of naptime, showed 31 percent more negative emotions than their rested counterparts.

Making sure a child’s sleep zone is dry and comfortable is important for sleep. Protect-A-Bed makes mattress protectors  that are 100 percent waterproof that provide ultimate protection against liquids and stains, as well as allergens and dust mites.

 

Poor Sleep Linked to Alzheimer’s in Recent Study

Findings from a new study have been released regarding the connection between disturbed sleep and preclinical signs of Alzheimer’s disease.

A small group of “cognitively normal” participants who reported frequently lying awake at night, showed higher levels of brain plaques, a sign of Alzheimer’s disease. Yo-El Ju, MD, and colleagues, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, said in a statement they’re still unsure if there’s a cause-and-effect relationship between the two.

“Further research is needed to determine why this is happening and whether sleep changes may predict cognitive decline,” Ju said.

More on the study can be found on ABC News’ website.

Poor Sleep Linked to Alzheimer’s in Recent Study

Findings from a new study have been released regarding the connection between disturbed sleep and preclinical signs of Alzheimer’s disease.

A small group of “cognitively normal” participants who reported frequently lying awake at night, showed higher levels of brain plaques, a sign of Alzheimer’s disease. Yo-El Ju, MD, and colleagues, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, said in a statement they’re still unsure if there’s a cause-and-effect relationship between the two.

“Further research is needed to determine why this is happening and whether sleep changes may predict cognitive decline,” Ju said.

More on the study can be found on ABC News’ website.

 

Lighting from Electronics Makes Sleep Difficult

Going to bed with your cell phone in hand and computer and TV on may be causing minor sleep deprivation. Studies show that the blue light emitted by these electronic devices can be the cause of sleepless nights.

“In that hour before bedtime, there are millions of Americans who are getting exposed to bright light, blue light from their computer screens or television screens,” said Dr. Russell Rosenberg, CEO of Atlanta School of Sleep Medicine, in an interview with FOX News Latino.

Dr. Rosenberg said the blue wavelength that these various devices give off, trigger a person’s inner alarm clock, leading the body to think it is time to wake up. The light exposure also tells the brain to stop producing melatonin, which is needed for sleep.
Dr. Rosenberg recommends turning devices off at least an hour before sleep. He also suggests not checking them or turning them on if sleep is disrupted in the middle of the night.

Sleeping Pills Linked with Cancer and Early Death

A new study compared more than 10,000 people who used sleep aids to almost twice as many people, with similar health histories, who did not use sleep aids.

Photo Credit: Google Images via DailyGossip.org

Photo Credit: Google Images via DailyGossip.org

Researchers found that participants using sleeping pills were four times more likely to have died during the study’s 2.5 year follow up, than those who did not.

Researchers also reported a 35 percent increased risk of cancer among participants using sleeping pills, when compared to non-prescription participants. TIME.com reports that study leader Dr. Daniel Kripke, co-director of research at the Scripps Clinic, said the risk of developing lymphoma, lung, colon or prostate cancer due to sleeping pills is greater than the effect from smoking.

The study also reported a correlation between the number of doses people were prescribed and the likelihood of death before the end of the study. Patients taking 132 doses or more a year were five times more likely to die than those not taking sleeping pills.

Dreams Found to Ease Painful Memories

Research conducted at the University of California, Berkeley, found that dreaming may act as “overnight therapy,” taking the edge off of painful memories.

Subjects in the study were shown emotionally provocative photos before sleep, and then received brain scans while sleeping.  During REM (rapid eye movement) sleep, part of the brain that handles emotions shut off, or slowed functioning. Subjects reported less of an emotional reaction to the photos the following morning.

Researchers do put a disclaimer on the findings: Dreaming is not a cure-all for emotional stress. David Kuhlmann, medical director for sleep medicine at Bothwell Regional Health Center in Sedalia, Mo.,  explained that dreaming only “helps improve the ability to handle stressful situations” and does not eliminate bad memories.